10/10/2017

Aboriginal skin cloaks

Aboriginal people throughout south-eastern and western Australia wore skin cloaks, as these temperate zones were much cooler than the northern parts of Australia. The cloaks were made from the skins of possums, kangaroos, wallabies and other fur bearing animals. Early European observations noted that many of the local Aboriginal people wore skin cloaks. These observations

10/10/2017

Paploma and Quilt: Uncovering Stories of Greek Australian Women

Uncovering Stories of Greek Australian Women Current estimates put the number of Australians who either came from Greece or are of Greek descent at around 500,000 to 700,000. Put against these figures, the number of quilts registered to date, from Greek Australian women is miniscule. We can safely assume that there is still much ‘uncovering’

10/10/2017

Old Irish patchwork quilts and traditions

Traditionally, Irish patchwork quilts consisted of two layers, the top and the backing, quilted together with wave or chevron patterns. The very early patchwork quilts made in England, and those originally introduced in Ireland, also had wave or chevron patterns holding two layers together. It is often commented upon that the Irish did not do

10/10/2017

Wagga Rugs

Australia has an important heritage of ‘quilts’ made by men. This heritage is in danger of being lost in the current wave of interest in old functional quilts made by women. I am referring, of course, to Wagga Rugs or Woggas or Woggers or Waggas. Of course the men didn’t call them quilts. You can’t